What are a top chef's favourite cooking utensils?

THE BEST: He has been a staple in Australia's restaurant scene for nearly 30 years, but what does Mark Best rate as the top tools in his home kitchen?

THE BEST: He has been a staple in Australia's restaurant scene for nearly 30 years, but what does Mark Best rate as the top tools in his home kitchen?

Next year, Australian chef Mark Best will celebrate 30 years of cooking amazing food. In that time he has been awarded Chef of the Year and Restaurant of the Year (at former Sydney restaurant Marque) by various industry publications, and held three Hats in the Sydney Morning Herald's Good Food guide for 10 consecutive years. He has also published recipe books and opened a restaurant on a luxury cruise ship.

So what does a top chef choose when it comes to kitchen utensils at home? Mark turned the heat down to low to take time and share his favourites.

Thermomix TM3. I love this machine because it combines the processes of a blender, and heating to 100° at the same time. This has multiple creative applications, such as my Parmesan custard which is very difficult to do otherwise.

Isomac single group coffee machine. Barista quality coffee at home, what's not to love. This little single group machine is a pocket sized domestic machine with pro results (depending on the maker of course).

Bamboo chopping board. Given to me a decade ago by Chef Ming of Simply Ming fame. This bamboo composite board is in constant use and shows no signs of wear.

Victorionox peeler. This is the best peeler I've ever used. So sharp and the head is at the perfect offset angle. I love it because good design is always the best solution.

Salad spinner. The Zyliss salad spinner is indispensable. There is only one thing worse than grit in your salad, and that is wet salad. It is also perfect for washing and drying herbs that are full of sand, such as coriander, without any bruising.

AEG Induction SensePro Wireless Food Sensor. I just love the new technology from AEG. The AEG Wireless Food Sensor allows precise control of your heat levels from low temperature cooking right through to cooking your steak to the perfect doneness.

HANDY: The AEG ambassador loves the brand's wireless food sensor, which allows precise control of your heat levels, from low temperature cooking right through to cooking your steak exactly how you want.

HANDY: The AEG ambassador loves the brand's wireless food sensor, which allows precise control of your heat levels, from low temperature cooking right through to cooking your steak exactly how you want.

Poterie Renault earthenware bowl. I have had my large Poterie Renault mixing bowl for decades. It is a beautiful piece and I use it for mixing everything. It also doubles duty as a beautiful salad bowl. Heavy salt glazed 'grès' stoneware spouted mixing bowls from Argent sur Sauldre, near Orléans, central France. Glazed to the rim and interior, left unglazed to the outside - their weight and thermal mass make them the ideal pastry bowl.

Kunz saucing spoon. It was designed by chef Gray Kunz back when he was heading up Lespinasse in New York City and was originally only given to chefs who worked in his kitchen. The proportions of the spoon are a little different than average. The bowl is larger, holding an exact 2.5 tablespoons, and it has a slightly tapered edge. It is really the perfect professional chef spoon.

Kitchen Street chef knife. Kappabashi Street in Tokyo is where you can find plastic food samples. Cooking utensils, stoves, tables, chairs, signs, lanterns and the best knives money can buy. I particularly like knives that use a Japanese blade formation with a European style handle. In this case the maker copied the handle design of my favourite French Knife maker, Sebatier. It fits my hand perfectly.