Proposal for audio-trails to highlight Aboriginal lands around South Australia

VISION: Mark Koolmatrie, Colin Koolmatrie and Mark Potter discuss a unique proposal.

VISION: Mark Koolmatrie, Colin Koolmatrie and Mark Potter discuss a unique proposal.

Tourists may one day be able to listen on their mobile phones to stories about Aboriginal settlement around South Australia.

This would result from a series of audio-trails being promoted by a businessman and an indigenous leader.

The first proposal is for a project on the Fleurieu Peninsula, but the program could be extended to the Mid North and elsewhere across the state.

Businessman Mark Potter said his team wanted to increase the national and international tourism profile of Aboriginal cultural history and storytelling on the peninsula as well as generate income for indigenous communities.

"This would be through the creation of a content-rich, two-day self-drive trail supported by print and digital media," he said.

"The trail will spread visitors and the tourism economy across the greater region by offering two 'inter-link' day trips - one to the east and one to the west of Victor Harbor Road. It would involve visitors in at least one overnight stay to allow them to enjoy both trails.

"Supported by quality print media at regional and state visitor centres, the trial will come to life on tourists' digital devices, such as desktops, tablets and phones, via the Daytrippa platform.

"It would provide live GPS mapping, rich photo galleries and audio storytelling created by tribal elders representing the region."

(We) want to increase the national and international tourism profile of Aboriginal cultural history...

Mr Potter told Australian Community Media that his team was seeking $35,000 from the state government toward the cost of the project.

The audio-trail would be a combination of free and paid service and would generate income for indigenous people.

It would be free in simple form such as print media and limited digital use while a "payment gateway" would unlock audio storytelling and hidden sites of significance.

Mr Potter, who is collaborating with southern SA's Kukabrak leader Mark Koolmatrie, outlined how payments from the service would go to the region's Aboriginal communities that were responsible for the content.

"The release of 'rich' content for about $45 will allow for the product to be commissioned by third parties," he said.

"The self-drive experience will be a means of 'upselling' more formal accompanied tours with Aboriginal guides sharing their cultural heritage face-to-face."

"Based upon its success, our longer-term aim will be to create a site ... allowing for expansion to present an unlimited number of Aboriginal cultural experiences, each under the independent control of local Aboriginal communities."

The Daytrippa platform is established in SA, supporting more than 20 regions with more than 30,000 visitors in 2017-18.

Trails already provided include the Heritage Rail Trail which links Broken Hill to Port Pirie via Peterborough and the Southern Flinders Ranges and the Goyder Regional Council's Burra Heritage Passport.

This story Hear our cultural heritage first appeared on The Recorder.

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