Gawler students burst the isolation bubble

Luke Mollet, Casey Cammans and Amelia Sharrad, alumni of Trinity College at Gawler, have banded together to create The Quarantine Project to help combat the negative aspects of social isolation.
Luke Mollet, Casey Cammans and Amelia Sharrad, alumni of Trinity College at Gawler, have banded together to create The Quarantine Project to help combat the negative aspects of social isolation.

Self isolation can be a lonely and mundane time, but three former Trinity College students have a plan to cure the boredom.

Luke Mollet, Casey Cammans and Amelia Sharrad, all based around Gawler, have joined forces to create The Quarantine Project.

The project will stretch across a number of social media platforms, such as Zoom and Facebook Live.

It was created with the goal to form a community and keep motivation levels high during the COVID-19 pandemic.

"We have kind of just been sitting around at our houses all day, everyday and no one is doing much" Luke said.

"So it had this idea of 'how can we get people to still use their brains'. So I began thinking about how we can use (technology) the right way and a productive way to teach one another a new skill."

Luke reached out to Casey with his idea which got the wheels in motion before Amelia came on board.

Members of the public would be able to tune into sessions over the course of three days throughout the week.

The first session would be an instructional class on Zoom where participants would learn a new skill, such as cooking, arts and crafts or fitness tips as well as practical skills like changing a tyre.

There were a broad range of topics in the pipeline with about 20 tutors already interested in taking part.

The second session, dubbed an 'expert session', would take place on Facebook Live with a number of Question and Answer sessions lined up.

Already an Associate Professor at the University of Adelaide, an AFL footballer and some basketballers had signed up to take part.

There was potential for this to branch out to training drills for younger athletes to learn from a professional and stay fit while local sport was postponed.

Finally on Friday nights it was envisioned that social nights would be held through avenues like Netflix watch parties, gaming sessions or social drinks nights.

All of this had been set up in less than two weeks.

The trio agreed that a platform like this was of great importance during these testing times.

"With things like Facebook, Instagram and YouTube people can easily binge and learn the stuff they want to, so that's not the problem. The problem we see is the whole social isolation," Casey said.

"That's where we found a massive importance because people are posting online - they are getting bored, sad and lonely but not a lot of people have the resources to actually tap into the social aspects."

Amelia noted that the project had a focus on people's mental health during isolation.

"These are really weird times, we have never experienced anything like this before," she said.

"It's about getting in contact with people you wouldn't normally get in contact with and I think that is super important for mental health at the moment."

Initial feedback has been extremely positive from friends, family and the wider community.

The team are open to suggestions for classes and for tutors who would like to be involved. You don't need to be a professional in a particular field to run a class.

Schedules will be posted each Sunday at their Facebook page, The Quarantine Project.

This story Gawler students burst the isolation bubble first appeared on Barossa & Light Herald.