Administrators still looking at troubled indigenous group

GOOD MOVE: Andyamathanha elder Charlie Jackson welcomes an extension to a review of his community's Port Augusta-based corporation.
GOOD MOVE: Andyamathanha elder Charlie Jackson welcomes an extension to a review of his community's Port Augusta-based corporation.

A troubled Port Augusta-based indigenous group has come under renewed investigation.

The Adnyamathanha Traditional Lands Association had been under special administration by the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations since earlier this year after concerns were raised about its activities.

The first term of administration ended on June 30 and was extended by three months to last Friday, September 25, then by another three months to December 18.

An advisory committee set up by administrators Bevan Mailman and Brian Bero has been meeting every Friday to discuss plans for the future.

Committee member and Adnyamathanha elder Charlie Jackson welcomed the extension of the review.

"We meet every week and they present us with outcomes of what comes as a result of the entities that the association has established," he said.

"They are trying to set up transparency and accountability so that the community is more informed to participate with it.

"It is coming along really good.

"I cannot wait for us to have a community meeting where we can share all these ideas in terms of where the association has been and where we would like to take it."

The advisory committee meets by teleconference with members located in Quorn, Adelaide and Gladstone.

In a message to association members, the administrators headed a section of their report with the words "tighter controls for spending and improved financial policies".

They said they had worked with the association's new book-keeper and accountants, Yaran Business Services, to develop a budget and forecast and introduce spending controls.

This included developing "adequate financial delegations' framework and appropriate policies and procedures".

The measures would ensure the corporation could "manage its day-to-day business including cultural heritage and Native Title matters".

Mr Jackson is also a member of Port Augusta City Council's new Aboriginal Advisory Group. It comprises Mr Jackson and six women.

"Our first meeting was conducted informally while talking about our profile," he said.

"I look forward to support we can give to the council and help shape their strategies. They can help shape projects for Aboriginal people as well."

This story Native Title group review first appeared on The Transcontinental.

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