Paddy's Law passes to put warning labels on LPG bottles

Paddy's Law, which passed through the South Australian Lower House this week, has been named in honour of the late Paddy Ryan. Photo courtesy of the Ryan family.

Paddy's Law, which passed through the South Australian Lower House this week, has been named in honour of the late Paddy Ryan. Photo courtesy of the Ryan family.

Labels warning of the dangers of inhaling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) will be mandatory on gas bottles sold or refilled in South Australia following the passage of a law in state parliament on Wednesday.

The Lower House voted in support of a Private Member's Bill which will ban the sale of LPG bottles unless the cylinder in which the gas is sold or supplied, or to which the gas is transferred to, has an appropriate label warning that inhaling the gas may cause injury or death.

Fines of up to $50,000 will apply to those who contravene the laws.

The bill was in response to the death of Port Lincoln teenager Paddy Ryan, who died from heart failure after inhaling from an LPG bottle at a party in February last year.

Introduced by SA Best MLC and health spokesperson Connie Bonaros, and introduced into the Lower House by Labor MP Blair Boyer, the bill was named 'Paddy's Law' in honour of Paddy and his family.

Paddy's family had been advocating for warning labels to appear on LPG bottles, and his father Adrian Ryan said he was pleased to learn of the bill's passage.

He said the warning labels would help young people learn of what the dangers were and despite the process taking some time he felt it was inevitable the bill would pass.

"It gives these guys an opportunity to learn of what the consequences were," he said.

Mr Ryan said he believed if there were labels on bottles his son and his friends would not have been inhaling the gas.

Ms Bonaros celebrated the bill's passage and said the new laws would save lives.

"I don't want any family to have to go through the same tragedy that Paddy Ryan's family has, and continues, to go through each and every day," she said.

"If this Bill saves but one life, it is worth its weight in gold."

Mr Boyer said the passage was a victory for common sense.

"Nothing will bring back Paddy Ryan but his father Adrian should be proud that his incredible advocacy on this issue has finally resulted in a practical measure that will hopefully prevent another death like Paddy's," he said.

Member for Flinders Peter Treloar had also supported the bill and said he was pleased to see the bill had passed.

"I am pleased for the Ryan familly and hopefully it can go some way to preventing any further tragedies," he said.

Under the new laws, the warning signs will generally be at least 10cm in length, except in the case of smaller gas bottles, where the minimum size of the warning sign will be 2cm in length.

Mr Ryan said he and the family thanked Ms Bonaros, Mr Boyer and Mr Treloar for their support.

He said the family had been moving forward since the tragedy and would continue to do so.

The bill would return to the Upper House on Thursday for final approval.

This story Paddy's Law passes first appeared on Port Lincoln Times.