The Unbreakable Farmer visits Kingston

Sessions: The Unbreakable Farmer, Warren Davies (centre), with Tracey Wanganeen (left), Kingston Mayor Kay Rasheed, Jade Bauer and Lou Stanfield. Photos: supplied.
Sessions: The Unbreakable Farmer, Warren Davies (centre), with Tracey Wanganeen (left), Kingston Mayor Kay Rasheed, Jade Bauer and Lou Stanfield. Photos: supplied.

Warren Davies, 'The Unbreakable Farmer,' visited Kingston last week, running two sessions in town to share his story with the community.

At the sessions, which took place through Nutrien Ag Solutions Kingston SE and Breaking The Silence Suicide Prevention Network, Mr Davies spoke about the struggles he faced while working on farms and the affect those challenges had on his mental health.

The Unbreakable Farmer shared strategies that were designed to assist people to encourage one another if they were struggling.

"I related my experience and the spiral that those challenges put me in," Mr Davies told The Leader.

"I shared some of the strategies and important things that I have picked up on along the way."

Gathering: Ian Marwood (left), Damian Little and Kingston District Council elected member Tim Harding enjoyed listening in to The Unbreakable Farmer's story.

Gathering: Ian Marwood (left), Damian Little and Kingston District Council elected member Tim Harding enjoyed listening in to The Unbreakable Farmer's story.

Mr Davies also mentioned that while presenting he had heard about a range of perspectives within a variety of communities, stressing to the townspeople that they were not alone in these situations.

"A lot of people are struggling with those things but the main message that I wanted to get out there is the fact that it is okay not to be okay but you need to be able to seek some help if you are facing challenges or struggling," he said.

The Unbreakable Farmer emphasised the importance of identifying someone who was struggling in the community after looking for the warning signs and then executing strategies.

"You might have noticed that someone in the community is struggling and we talked about how to open up those conversations and make sure that we are checking in with those people," he explained.

"If that person is isolating themselves from their community and maybe that they are angry or just doing behavioral things that are out of the norm, be aware of those behavioral signs...it is also about opening up that conversation and making sure that we are asking open ended questions."

Mr Davies went through the concept of having balance in one's life and how it can make a difference to an individual's mental health.

"We need to make sure that we are building that unbreakable wheel of well-being and ensuring that our lives are balanced," he said.

"I gave the audience a couple of exercises that they can do around making sure that their wheel is balanced and if it is not balanced, it is about making sure that they are controlling things that they can control and if it is outside their control, they need to look at seeking some help to improving the balance of that wheel."

Informative: Henry Goode (left), Elected member Rick Wingard and Dean Goode had the opportunity to learn about the strategies Warren Davies past on during his sessions.

Informative: Henry Goode (left), Elected member Rick Wingard and Dean Goode had the opportunity to learn about the strategies Warren Davies past on during his sessions.

He also mentioned that he had an excellent response from the Kingston community.

"I have done work previously in the Gippsland and in the Upper Murray in Victoria where bushfires have been even though I wasn't effected directly, I have been on the ground in those areas and I understand the effect that they have on people," he said.

"I have had a number of people thank me for coming to Kingston and for sharing my story."

Mr Davies finished by stressing the importance of sharing one's story and how that could help someone gain an understanding of their own story, break down the stigma attached to men's mental health and encourage people to seek help.

"There is a lot of power in story telling - we have all got a story and we probably need to share it and if sharing that story helps either you by getting it off your chest, that's great, but it might also help someone indirectly - that is really important," he said.

"I love what I do - I am blessed to be able to travel around the country and go to these communities because rural and regional communities are my passion and Kingston was no exception."

If anyone would wish to learn more about these strategies, they can contact Warren Davies at www.theunbreakablefarmer.com.au, email him at theunbreakablefarmer@gmail.com or contact through his Facebook or Instagram profiles.